PUSHED OUT?

How Desirée Rogers Knew It Was Over

Though Desirée Rogers didn't resign until February 2010, the first signs of her split with the White House came in spring 2009, when the social secretary was dressed down by David Axelrod for a variety of perceived offenses, among them posing for glossy magazines in expensive clothing and jewelry—not exactly the kind of image the White House wanted to be presenting during a recession. Despite Rogers' skill at planning events, her relationship with the rest of the Obama administration and with Washington society became too strained in the wake of the party-crashing Salahis, whose uninvited appearance at a State Dinner provoked a congressional investigation. According to anonymous sources quoted by The New York Times, Rogers feels she was hung out to dry by the White House. But Rahm Emanuel, of all people, had kind words: "She did a good job of projecting a White House that was open, family-friendly and classy."