Jane Ciabattari’s reviews, interviews, and cultural reporting have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, The Guardian, NPR.org, The Boston Globe, Salon, The Paris Review, Los Angeles Times, O the Oprah Magazine, The Washington Post, Columbia Journalism Review, and The East Hampton Star, among others. She is vice president/online and former president of the National Book Critics Circle and author of the short-story collection Stealing the Fire. Her recent short stories are online at The Literarian, KGB Bar Lit, Verbsap, Literary Mama, and Lost Magazine, and in Long Island Noir, edited by Kaylie Jones.

Yiyun Li Takes on Evil 

Though born in Beijing Yiyun Li writes English better than most native writers. She talks about her new book, her childhood, and the darkness of humanity.

Confused

Allende Hate-Writes a Mystery

Bestseller author Isabel Allende caused a furor when she dismissed mysteries while she herself was promoting her new novel, a mystery itself. She talks to Jane Ciabattari about the controversy and why she tried her hand at the genre.

Silk and Lace

The Tricky Business of Sex

Novelist Amy Tan talks about her new novel, The Valley of Amazement, set in a Shanghai courtesan house, how she researched Chinese history, and learning how to write about sex.

Sociopaths

Murder, She Wrote

Jayne Anne Phillips talks about her new novel, ‘Quiet Dell,’ inspired by the ‘Bluebeard’ murders in Depression-era West Virginia, one of America’s most sensational serial killings.

Invisible Manor

The House that Slavery Built

Mac Griswold tells Jane Ciabattari about an estate near the Hamptons that used to be one of the largest slave-owning plantations in the North.

After War

The Way Home

How do you return from war? That was the question Roxana Robinson set out to answer in her new novel, Sparta. She spoke to Jane Ciabattari about how she researched the experiences of veterans—and why she used that title.

May Reads

Happy Short Story Month!

May is Short Story Month. Here are Jane Ciabattari’s favorite new collections, from an ironic new voice to a posthumous release.